Garage/Workshop conversion
Garage-workshop conversion
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PHASE 1. Back door removal & window replacement.
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PHASE 2. Construction of a stud framework supporting eight joists. PHASE 3. Plasterboard ceiling construction. PHASE 4. Partition construction with relocated door. PHASE 5. Construction of mezzanine floor. PHASE 6. Installation of wall insulation & OSB sheathing. PHASE 7. Electrical re-wiring.
Garage/Workshop conversion
Garage/workshop conversion
FITTING OUT PROJECTS WOOD-TURNING
PROJECTS
APPENDIX 1. Measurements & materials.

Phase 1. Synopsis for Clearance, Removal of Back Door, Replacement of Wooden Window & Making Good Inside and Out


Work initially concentrated on clearing the garage to enable the builders to remove the door frame & associated window (on the back wall), before fitting a new UPVC window spanning the entire width of the wall. Breeze blocks were used to infill part of the doorway and these were rendered externally with pebble dash. The window was made good on the inside with the addition of an internal wooden sill and rigid UPVC angle (for the side and head jambs), on a studwork surround with OSB sheathing & padding.

Details

Progress as at 21st April 2015 Inside the Garage, 21st April 2015

A lot of clearing to do before the builders can get to remove the integral door and window frames at the back end!

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Detailed view of old window and door Old Window and Door, 25th April 2015

This view was possible after a large amount of clearance. Wooden window and door to be replaced by a wider UPVC window in the next few weeks. Note how the top of the combined wooden window and door frames are all that are supporting the overlying brickwork of the gable end. The wooden door was re-used as an entrance to the workshop.

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Window Installation

The 15th of May 2015 was the day scheduled for the the window installation. Before the builders arrived I was able to easily remove the back door without damaging the hinges. The two glass panels (set into the door), were also removed and, apart from some superficial weathering and some displacement on two tenon joints, the 85 year old door was found to be in good condition and capable of being re-used later in the project.

However, when the window installers arrived it became apparent that there had been a slight misunderstanding as it was assumed that we (not Outlook Windows) were going to brick up the base of the door. Second, much bigger problem, discovered that the existing wooden window and door frames were all that were supporting the overlying brick gable of the garage. After some discussion, it was agreed that a concrete lintel would need to be inserted before the window/door frame could be removed. Fortunately the Outlook Windows team agreed to undertake this additional work, and it was done the same day and left over the weekend to allow time for the concrete bedding of the lintel to set. The new window was re-scheduled to be installed on 21st May 2015.

The Installation in Pictures

Door removed successfully Door Removed Successfully, 15th May 2015.

Removal of the back door without damaging the hinges. The two glass panels (set into the door), were also easily removed and, apart from some superficial weathering and some displacement on two tenon joints, the 85 year old door was found to be in good condition.

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Old window removed & lintel installed successfully. Old Window Removed & Lintel Installed Successfully, 15th May 2015.

Greg & Steve of Outlook Windows successfully installed a concrete lintel above the old window and door frames and were then able to remove the original wooden framework. The metal and wooden props were used to hold the lintel in place whilst the bedding cement cured.

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Lintel installed & old window removed successfully External View of New Lintel, 15th May 2015.

External view of new lintel and temporary props. Note the one brick thickness (105mm), of the garage wall beneath the external pebble-dash covering (render).

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Internal view of new window Internal View of New Window, 21st May 2015.

New window fitted OK but we then had the job of bricking up the gap underlying the left hand side of the window in the position of the old doorway.

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External view of new window External View of New Window, 21st May 2015.

External view, showing the old doorway gap beneath the new window on the right hand side.

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FILLING THE GAP

The gap beneath the window measured 945mm wide by 880mm high. This would have needed about 60 conventional bricks to infill. We decided that a much better solution was to use breeze blocks instead of conventional bricks. Breeze blocks are much larger (so less are required), and lighter in weight than bricks. They are manufactured from the ashes of coal, coke, etc, bonded together by cement and are particularly well suited in the construction of walls that bear relatively small loads. We found that Wickes do a lightweight form called Aerated Blocks which also have the advantage that they can be cut to size where necessary with an old carpentry saw. They measure 440mm in length, 215mm depth and 100mm width. 10 of these blocks, were purchased. When laid on their side, the width of 100mm was almost identical with that of the existing bricks of the garage which were 4 ⅛" (105mm) in width. These aerated blocks seemed to be ideal for filling the gap.

Blocks & mortar Blocks & Mortar, 22nd May 2015.

10 Aerated Blocks plus mortar purchased from Wickes. The blocks (440mm x 215mm x 100mm), are surprisingly light and ten were easily fitted into the boot of the car.

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Cutting Aerated Blocks to size with a saw Cutting Aerated Blocks, 22nd May 2015.

The Aerated Blocks can be fairly easily cut to size using an old carpentry saw.

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Photograph showing the comparative depth of the blocks & the surrounding bricks. Comparative widths of blocks and bricks, 22nd May 2015.

This photograph of work in progress shows the close correspondence in width between the Aerated Blocks (100mm), and the surrounding bricks (105mm). The discrepancy was easily masked on the external wall by the use of a pebble dash render (to match that covering the exterior of the existing brick wall).

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Work in progress filling the gap. Work in progress, 22nd May 2015.

Work in progress filling the gap, internal view. Shows the comparative sizes of the larger blocks to the smaller bricks. It was found that the water in the mortar was being drawn out too rapidly when applied to the blocks, making it difficult to work and bed the blocks down. The problem was solved by using a paint brush to apply water to the faces of the blocks just before they were bedded into the mortar.

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Blockwork completed, internal view Blockwork completed, 22nd May 2015.

Internal view of completed blockwork. The gap between the base of the window frame and the blockwork was sealed with an expanding plastic foam filler. Note the two lengths of 20mm diameter electrical conduit passing through the wall via the mortar joints. One of these was subsequently connected to an outside weather-proof socket for running garden appliances such as an electric lawn mower and hedge trimmer, whilst the other will eventually deliver a 24 volt current to run a pump which is part of a garden pond water feature. Previously, external electrical appliances were powered by passing a cable through a hinged pane in the old wooden window of the garage.

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Blockwork completed, external view Blockwork completed, 23rd May 2015.

External view of completed blockwork. Ready for application of pebble-dash render to match the surrounding walls.

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Tools & materials for pebble-dashing Tools & Materials for Pebble-Dashing

Includes 25Kg bag of mortar, Cementone Freeflo Retarder Waterproofer and Plasticiser (liquid additive to mortar), Wickes Pea Shingle (for the pebble-dashing, as the flint composition was an almost identical match for the existing pebbles), Float, Hawk, Small shovel (for flicking the shingle at the wet mortar), Scraper, Mixing tub and Plastic beaker (for measuring out the Freeflo) mortar additive.

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First coat of render on breeze blocks. First Coat of Render, 6th June 2015.

Photograph taken after the first coat of mortar/render (with Freeflo additive) on the breeze blocks. Note the score marks (made with pointed trowel) ready for next coat of render plus pebbles.

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Photo of completed pebble-dashing. Photo of Completed Pebble-dashing, 8th June 2015.

Completed pebble-dashing using Wickes Pea Shingle. Note the two protruding ends of 20mm white conduit, one of which which will be used for attaching a weatherproof external power socket later in the project.

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Wiring the External Electric Socket. Wiring the External Electric Socket, 9th October 2015.

The pebble-dashed wall has been prepared by flattening an area with cold chisel and hammer, to accept the backplate of the power socket, secured with stainless self tapping screws and plastic plugs. 20mm diameter conduit (connected with a sealed fitting on the backplate of the socket), carries the cabling connecting into the internal power circuit. The use of stainless steel screws to fasten the power socket is most important as ordinary steel or zinc plated steel screws will corrode and rust very quickly

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Photo of completed external electric power socket. The Fitted Electric Socket, 9th October 2015.

The weatherproof power socket fitted in position on the external back wall of the garage.

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COMPLETING THE WINDOW INSIDE THE WORKSHOP.

This had to wait until the internal studwork and associated insulation surrounding the window had been completed. First an internal window sill was created (using a softwood window board), and OSB sheathing screwed to the adjacent wooden studwork to make up the foundation for the side & head jambs. Finally the jambs were lined with rigid UPVC angle.

Window framed by studwork. The Window Framed by Studwork, 18th June 2015.

The inside of the window surrounded by wooden studding.

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Insulation inserted in the studwork surrounding the window. Insulation Added

The gaps in the studwork surrounding the window were filled with 40mm thick foil-backed insulation board.

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A polythene vapour barrier stapled to the studwork surrounding the window. Vapour Barrier Installation, 25th September 2015.

A polythene vapour barrier on top of the insulation, was fixed in place using staples driven into the wooden studwork surrounding the window.

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Window board as purchased. Window Board as Purchased, 25th September 2015.

I decided to fit a softwood internal sill to the window. The window board as purchased was made of Redwood and measured 2,400mm x 219mm x 33mm. It was rather too wide and had to be cut to a useable width of 125mm.

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Window board cut to size. Window Board Cut to Size, 25th September 2015.

The board was cut to size using a jigsaw.

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Three angle brackets and screws for securing the window board. Securing the Window Board, 25th September 2015.

The board was fixed in place using three galvanised steel brackets. One end of each bracket was screwed to the bottom of the window board, whilst the other ends of the brackets were screwed to the stud work batten running beneath the window. The brackets were then concealed beneath a covering of OSB sheathing.

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Angle bracket screwed to the bottom of the window board. Angle Bracket Screwed to the Window Board, 25th September 2015.

The position was marked out accurately in pencil before fixing all three brackets in the same way to the window board.

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Window sill fixed by screwing brackets to wooden studwork. Window Sill Secured in Position, 25th September 2015.

The sill was fixed in position by screwing the three angle brackets to the wooden studwork running beneath the window (hidden under the polythene vapour barrier). The brackets were subsequently completely hidden beneath the OSB sheathing.

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Work in progress sheathing beneath the window with OSB. Sheathing Beneath the Window, 25th September 2015.

Work in progress sheathing beneath the window. The OSB sheathing is effectively concealing the brackets holding the window sill in place.

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Completed window sill. Completed Sill, 29th September 2015.

The completed window sill. It was coated with three coats of quick drying clear gloss varnish.

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The next stage was to make good the sides (jambs) of the window where it abutted the sheathing.

Window framed by studwork & OSB. Window Framed by OSB Padding, 27th September 2015.

Boards cut from OSB were screwed to the studwork on each side of the window to pad the jambs out ready for finishing with UPVC Plastic Rigid Angle.

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Plastic Rigid Angle as supplied. Plastic Rigid Angle, 29th September 2015.

Two lengths of Plastic Rigid Angle (100mm ( x 2mm thick) x 100mm (x 3mm thick) x 2.5m) as delivered.

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Marking out the UPVC prior to cutting. Marking out the UPVC Rigid Angle, 29th September 2015.

The marking out in pencil was done by using a set square, steel ruler, and a protractor to determine the positions of the 45° cuts for the chamfered joins.

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Cutting the UPVC with a fine toothed hand saw. Cutting the UPVC, 29th September 2015.

This was done using a fine-toothed hand saw.

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The rigid UPVC angle cut to size, ready for gluing in place. Ready for Fitting, 30th September 2015.

The rigid UPVC angle cut to size, ready for gluing in place on the side & head jambs of the window.

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Gripfill, used to glue the UPVC in place. Gripfill.

This is a very effective adhesive for securing the UPVC rigid angle to the OSB sheets.

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The completed window. Fixing the UPVC rigid angle, 30th September 2015.

After applying the Gripfill glue to the top and side UPVC rigid angle pieces, they were pressed into place against the OSB sides (jambs) of the window cavity. Some wedging laths of timber and a sash clamp in expanding mode were used to hold the UPVC in place whilst the Gripfill glue cured.

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The completed window. The Completed Window, 23rd October 2015.

The completed window,internal view. Acrylic sealer was used to fill the gaps between the rigid UPVC angle pieces and the UPVC of the window panels.

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23rd October 2015. The completion of Phase 1 of the project.

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