Garage/Workshop conversion
Garage-workshop conversion
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HOME PAGEPHASE 1. Back door removal & window replacement. PHASE 2. Construction of a stud framework supporting eight joists. PHASE 3. Plasterboard ceiling construction.

PHASE 4. Partition construction with relocated door.
(This page)

PHASE 5. Construction of mezzanine floor. PHASE 6. Installation of wall insulation & OSB sheathing. PHASE 7. Electrical re-wiring.
Garage/Workshop conversion
Garage/workshop conversion
FITTING OUT PROJECTS WOOD-TURNING
PROJECTS
APPENDIX 1. Measurements & materials.

Phase 4. Partition Wall Details


Partition Wall & Doorway Construction.

This partition was built to separate the outer or Vestibule area from the inner Workshop area. The stud framework was built using 95mm x 70mm pressure treated structural timber. The sole plate of the partition initially spanned the entire width of the workshop, with a gap for the door being cut later when the dimensions of the door lining/framework had been ascertained. There was a slight problem as the concrete floor was very uneven, leaving an unsupported space beneath the sole plate of the partition studwork, which had to be filled with timber wedges.

Details

2nd August 2015, Work started on partition wall framework.

Partition frame Sketch Plan of Partition Framework

Sketch plan showing dimensions of partition stud framework (as viewed from the vestible part of the garage).

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Partition frame Sole Plate Cross Section.

Sketch plan showing a cross section of the sole plate illustrating how it was fixed to the concrete floor.

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Sole plate fixing Sole Plate Fixing Components.

Ratchet spanner with 12mm socket fitted, 10mm diameter 50mm long plastic plug, 7mm diameter 100mm long hexagonal headed coach screw with washer, 20mm spade bit (for drilling clearance hole for the ratchet spanner), 5mm diameter extra long drill bit for drilling right through the 95mm thick timber stud. All the timber was pre-drilled using a drill press. Not shown are the masonry drill bits used to drill into the concrete floor. The components are resting on the sole plate and the photograph also shows one of the coach screws driven home, fixing the sole plate to the concrete floor.

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Partition frame Sole Plate Fixing, 1st August 2015.

Sole plate in the process of being screwed to the concrete floor. One problem was the uneveness of the floor. Note that it is easiest to install the soleplate as one unit, with no gap for the doorway. The doorway was cut later (See below).

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Work in progress on the partition stud wall Building the Partition, 2nd August 2015.

Work in progress erecting the partition stud wall.

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Screwing a noggin to a vertical stud, August 2015 Fixing a Noggin, August 2015.

Screwing one of the noggins to a vertical stud, August 2015.

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Alternative method of fixing a noggin to a vertical stud, August 2015 Alternative Method of Noggin Attachment, August 2015.

Where the noggin needs to be attached to a vertical stud against the wall, it is impossible to screw through the stud, so metal angle brackets screwed (not nailed) were used instead. I could have used skew screwing, but as I had a lot of builders angle brackets left over from a previous project, it seemed to make sense to use them here.

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Cutting the doorway 1. Cutting the Doorway (Stage 1), 27th August 2015.

Work in progress cutting the gap for the doorway in the partition soleplate. Here the right hand side of the doorway is being created by sawing through the soleplate. Note that plywood wedges have been inserted to compensate for a hollow in the concrete floor beneath the soleplate.

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Cutting the doorway 2. Cutting the Doorway (Stage 2), 27th August 2015.

Here the left side of the doorway is being created by sawing through the soleplate.

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Cutting the doorway 3. Cutting the Doorway (Stage 3), 27th August 2015.

The completed doorway cut in the sole plate.

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Completed partition studwork. Completed Partition Studwork, 1st September 2015.

Studwork for the Partition Wall completed using 95mm x 70mm timber. As well as screws, metal builders angle brackets were used to secure the vertical studs & noggins to the horizontal sole & wall plate timbers. The doorway is ready to accept the door frame (See illustrated attachment description below).

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Photograph & original drawing of completed partition studwork. Photograph & Drawing of Partition Studwork, 1st September 2015.

Comparison of the original drawing for the partition studwork (top), compared to a photograph of the completed studwork (below).

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Insulation board installed in studwork. Insulation Board Installation, 3rd September 2015.

Installation of 50mm thick Celotex foil-faced insulation board completed.

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OSB sheathing of partition completed. Completed OSB Sheathing, 30th September 2015.

Sheathing of both sides of the partition wall completed (18mm thick OSB above a polythene vapour barrier, fastened to the wooden studs with 5mm diameter, screws 60mm long). The next step will be to attach the door-frame (See next section).

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Making the Door Frame & Fitting the Door.

When designing the stud wall with an inset door it was important to ensure that the width of the door frame matched the total thickness of the wood used for the stud frame work, plus the thickness of the 18mm OSB sheathing. The total thickness required was 70mm (= width of stud timber) + 18mm x 2 (= thickness of OSB sheathing on both sides of the wall). 70mm + 36mm = 106mm. 106mm is a standard dimension for door lining kits (as supplied by Wickes & B & Q). However, door sizes are also now standardised to three common widths that are exact in terms of their imperial measurement; 2ft 3in (686mm), 2ft 6in (762mm), and 2ft 9in (838mm). I was using an old door from the back entrance of the garage. This door dated from about 1930 when the garage was built and was a non-standard width of 810mm (2ft 7 ⅞"). This meant none of the standard door frame kits could be used and I had to build a new frame from scratch using timber 106mm wide x 27mm thick.

Partition doorway details Sketch Plan of Door Frame

Sketch plan showing the required dimensions of the door frame in relation to the dimensions of the stud wall framework and OSB sheathing.

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door frame dimensions details Door Frame Dimensions

Sketch plan showing the required dimensions of the door frame components constructed from planed softwood 27mm thick.

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Pre-drilling fixing holes in door frame Pre Drilling the Door-Frame, 12th October 2015.

The screw holes (for attachment of the frame to the stud framework), were pre-drilled to a diameter of 5mm, and countersunk. Note the use of a drill press to facilitate accurate drilling.

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Assembling the door-frame Assembling the Door-Frame (1), 12th October 2015.

The door frame components, cut to size being screwed together using clamps and braces.

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Details of brace holding top and side of frame at right angles. Assembling the Door-Frame (2), 12th October 2015.

Details of brace holding top and side of frame at right angles. The measurements utilise Pythagoras's theorem, relating to the three sides of a right-angled triangle. It states that the square of the hypotenuse (the side opposite the right angle), is equal to the sum of the squares of the other two sides. Here the two sides (400 x 400=160,000) + (300 x 300=90,0000)=250,000) which is the same as the square of the hypotenuse 500 x 500=250,000).

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The completed frame. Assembling the door-frame (3), 12th October 2015.

The completed frame.

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Cutting off the waste wood from the frame top. Assembling the Door-Frame (4), 12th October 2015.

Cutting off the waste wood from the frame top (This is done at both ends of the top).

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Screwing the door frame in position. Attaching the Door-Frame to the Partition Studwork, 12th October 2015.

The door frame being screwed in position in the doorway of the stud partition wall.

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Backpacker packing shims. Backpacker Shims.

When screwing the door frame to the studwork, wedges are needed to fill the gaps between the frame and the studs. These can either be made out of wooden offcuts, or you can buy packs of plastic wedges as shown in the photograph. Broadfix Backpacker packing shims are ideal for this. These rot proof, water proof packers come in two sizes; small (53mm x 43mm) and Standard (101mm x 43mm) in 1mm, 3mm, 5mm, 6mm and 10mm thicknesses. The 'gate' feature on the Small Backpacker and the 'comb' feature on the Standard Backpacker have been designed to allow the packer to be pushed over a fixing prior to tightening up and prevent the packer from falling out. More information HERE.

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Refurbishing the Door.

Door sizes are now standardised to three common widths that are exact in terms of their imperial measurement; 2ft 3in (686mm), 2ft 6in (762mm), and 2ft 9in (838mm). I was using an old door from the back entrance of the garage. This door dated from about 1930 when the garage was built and was a non-standard width of 810mm (2ft 7 ⅞ inches). The door had to be stripped, filled and I also decided to remove the old hinges and fit new ones on the opposite side. The old latch plate and door handles were in too bad a state to re-use so a new latch and a rose door handle (designed for a fire door) were purchased as replacements.

The door in its original position. The Door in its Original Position, April 2015.

The door in its original position as a disused external back entrance to the garage. The door probably dates from the building of the garage in about 1930, so (in 2015) was over 85 years old!

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The door being refurbished. Door Refurbishment, 15th October 2015.

After careful removal of the two single panes of glass (window panels), and hinges, the old layers of paint were removed by a combination of chemical paint stripper, hot air gun and sandpaper.

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New door furniture. New Door Fittings, 16th October 2015.

New tubular latch and latch plate (right, above), striker plate (left, above), and 10mm square spindle with door-handles (below). It's important to ensure that the spindle aperture on the tubular latch corresponds to the dimension of the spindle purchased with the door handles!

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Drilling the hole for the tubular latch. Drilling the Hole for the Tubular Latch. 16th October 2015.

The hole was 22mm in diameter and 65mm deep (as specified on the latch's fitting instructions). A 22mm spade bit was used for this and it's very important to drill the hole as straight and true as possible.

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Drawing round the tubular latch for chiselling rebate. Making the Latch Rebate, 16th October 2015.

With the latch fitted in the hole, a pencil was used to draw round the fore-end of the latch so that a rebate could be chiselled out to enable the latch plate to fit flush with the door edge.

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The completed rebate for the latch plate. Rebate Completed, 16th October 2015.

The Completed Latch Plate Rebate.

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Measuring down 45mm to drill the hole for the spindle. Marking the position for the Spindle Hole, 16th October 2015.

Measuring vertically down, 45mm from the door edge, for the position to drill the 10mm diameter hole for the spindle.

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Drilling the hole for the spindle. Drilling the Spindle Hole. 16th October 2015.

Important to ensure as far as possible that the hole is at right angles to the door.

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The fitted latch & door handles. The Fitted Latch & Door Handles. 16th October 2015.

The spindle was slightly too long and was subsequently trimmed using a hacksaw.

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Marking the position of the top hinge on the door edge. Marking Out the Top Hinge Rebate. 17th October 2015.

The top of the hinge is 150mm from the top edge of the door. The standard positioning for hinges on a door edge are 150mm down from the top (for the top hinge), and 225mm up from the bottom (for the lower hinge).

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Using a craft knife to incise along the pencil boundary of the top hinge outline on the door edge. Incising the Top Hinge Rebate. 17th October 2015.

Using a craft knife to incise along the pencil boundary of the top hinge outline. This is a precursor to chiselling out the hinge rebate.

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The completed hinge rebate. The Completed Rebate, 17th October 2015.

The completed rebate after chiselling out.

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The hinge fitted. The Hinge Fitted. 17th October 2015.

The hinge fitted and screwed into place.

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Outlining the position of the hinge on the door frame. Marking the Top Hinge Position, 17th October 2015.

Establishing the position of the top hinge on the door frame. After pencilling in the outline, the rebate for the hinge was chiselled out in exactly the same way as for the hinge rebates on the door.

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The door fitted in place. The Fitted Door, 18th October 2015.

After screwing the three hinges to the door it was carefully fitted in place by screwing the hinges to the three rebates in the frame. To my relief, the door opened and closed OK within the door frame with no further adjustments required! Using the previously fitted door handle and latch, the next job was to fit the latch plate on the door frame. Replacement glass panels and an architrave surrounding the door frame were also yet to be fitted.

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The latch plate, screwed to the door frame. Attaching the Latch Plate to the Door Frame. 18th October 2015.

This was fitted by closing the door gently against the door frame. Using the latch fitted to the door, the top and bottom positions of the latch plate can then be marked, using a pencil, on the door frame. The striker plate is positioned within the markers and, using a pencil, a line drawn round the striker plate and the enclosed area marking the position of the receiving hole. Timber was removed with a chisel to create an overall rebate for the latch plate and also the deeper receiving hole to accommodate the tongue of the latch bolt.

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Replacement glass panels for the door. New Glass Panels for the Door. 18th October 2015.

These were replacements for the two original panes of ordinary glass removed from the door. The replacements were two double glazed toughened glass units manufactured to the same size as the original panes by a company called PANE-LESS GLASS.

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Bull-nose skirting board for architrave. Bull-nose Skirting Board for Architrave.

This skirting board measuring 70mm wide and 15mm thick, made an ideal simple architrave for the door.

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Making the door architrave. Making the Door Architrave. 18th October 2015.

Using a mitre block to cut a mitre joint in the bull-nose skirting board for the door architrave.

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The completed door, interior view. The Completed Door, Interior View. 23rd October 2015.

The architrave has been nailed into place using panel pins (one of the few occasions I have opted for nailing instead of screwing!). The replacement double glazed glass panels are held in place by means of beading secured with panel pins. The door, plus architrave, has been finished with quick drying (water-based) gloss varnish.

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The completed door, exterior view. The Completed Door, Exterior View. 22nd October 2015.

The completed, fitted door, exterior view.

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Partition with insulation, OSB sheathing and refurbished door, completed 22nd October 2015.


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