Garage/Workshop
Garage-workshop conversion
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HOME PAGE FITTING OUT & PROJECT PAGES. PROJECT 1.
Bandsaw Installation & Configuration.
PROJECT 2.
Construction of a workbench.
PROJECT 3.
Making a Wood-turning Sandpaper Dispenser.

PROJECT 4.
Log Cutting Sled Jigs for the Bandsaw
(This page)

PROJECT 5.
Making a Chainsaw Horse.
PROJECT 6.
An Electric Chainsaw Mill.

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Laburnum bowl
WOOD-TURNING
PROJECTS
Current Wood-Turning Project
Walnut Wood.
WT PROJECT 1
Making Belaying Pins
WT PROJECT 2
Experimental Drying
WT PROJECT 3
Walnut Platter.
WT PROJECT 4
Turning Green Cherry.

Workshop Fitting Out & Project Pages.


Log Cutting Sled Jigs for the Bandsaw.


These jigs are the most useful in the context of using the Bandsaw as an aid to woodturning when needing to make an initial straight cut in an irregular shaped log or in felled timber roughly cut to shape with a chainsaw.

Although the measurements given here relate to a particular bandsaw, the design can easily be adapted to fit most makes and models.

LOG CROSS-CUTTING JIG

It is dangerous to use a bandsaw to cut across a round log just using your hands to support the stock. As the blade bites into the log it will exert a strong forward twisting force which can bruise & crush your hands and could pull them towards the moving saw blade. At the same time the blade will be subject to considerable torque, which will either cause it to kink or probably snap, rebounding with considerable force. The jig described below is easy to make and simple to use as well as being safe.

Log Cross-cutting jig. Log Cross-cutting jig for the Record Power BS300X Bandsaw.

The jig is constructed from 570mm x 292mm x 18mm plywood for the platform, 292mm x 95mm x18mm plywood for the upstand, 570mm x 25mm square pine for the guide rail, and two blocks of softwood measuring 95mm square and 45mm thick for the reinforcement behind the upstand. The jig must always be used with a suitable bar-clamp to secure the wood firmly before commencing to cut.

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Log Cross-cutting jig as constructed. Log Cross-cutting jig as constructed.

The jig after construction, ready for use.

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Log Cross-cutting jig in use. Log Cross-cutting jig in use - 1.

The jig in use with an Axminster bar clamp to cut a small log of Olive wood. The log is held firmly against the upstand with the barclamp. Also note how the pine guide rail, abutting against the edge of the cast iron bandsaw table, ensures both a straight cut, whilst protecting the opposite edge of the jig from accidentally coming in contact with the saw blade. 23rd March 2016.

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Log Cross-cutting jig in use. Log Cross-cutting jig in use - 2.

The jig in use with two Axminster bar clamps, cutting a large log of Holly. 17th March 2016.

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Cross-cut-sled-in-use Movie clip of the cross-cut sled in use.

Movie clip of the sled being loaded with a round log of cherry, secured with a bar clamp, and then used with the bandsaw to make a cross-cut.

(Click picture to view movie)


LOG LONGITUDINAL CUTTING JIG

My design for this came after browsing many descriptions of log sleds on several websites, so I cannot claim it as an original. Although I have tailored it specifically for use with the Record Power BS300x Bandsaw, it could be used with any medium to large workshop bandsaw. Unlike many jigs of this type, this one operates to the left side of the saw blade and makes use of the bandsaw fence to ensure a straight cut. It is particularly useful for making an initial (or series of) straight slicing cut(s) along the length of irregularly shaped boles and boughs of trees up to the maximum depth of cut of the bandsaw.

It is integrated with an Axminster Trade Bar Clamp made of zinc plated, cold drawn steel, with serrated edges to engage securely with the non-slip mechanism of the sliding arm. Both the fixed and sliding arms are made of cast iron. The wooden handle allows for plenty of tightening torque and the sliding arm (of this particular clamp), gives a capacity ranging from zero to a maximum length of just over 400mm, a throat depth up to a maximum of 100mm, and a maximum clamping pressure of 280kg.

Using the Record Power BS300x Bandsaw, the clamp, integrated with the wooden jig, can slice logs up to 200mm (7¾") in diameter, and 360mm (14¼") in length.

Longitudinal-cutting jig for a Bandsaw. 3D-drawing of the Complete Jig.

This interactive Sketchup 3D-drawing, of the completed jig shows how the Axminster bar clamp is integrated with the wooden components. In particular it shows how the sliding arm of the clamp can be adjusted on the jig to accommodate varying lengths of the stock to be sliced.

(Click picture to view the interactive drawing)

The Flash application is required to view this drawing.

Longitudinal-cutting jig for a Bandsaw. 3D-drawing of the Wooden components of the jig.

Interactive Sketchup 3D-drawing, of the completed wooden components (without the bar clamp) of the jig.

(Click picture to view the interactive drawing)

The Flash application is required to view this drawing.

Log longitudinal-cutting jig. Log Longitudinal-cutting jig for the Record Power BS300X Bandsaw.

Exploded view of the jig showing constructional details.

(Click picture for larger view)

How the jig integrates with the Bar Clamp. How the jig integrates with the Bar Clamp.

The Axminster Trade Bar Clamps are made of zinc plated, cold drawn steel, profiled to minimise flexing and bending. with serrated edges to engage securely with the non-slip mechanism of the sliding arm. Both the fixed and sliding arms are made of high-grade, ductile cast iron. The wooden handle allows for plenty of tightening torque. The clamp used here has a clamping capacity ranging from zero to a maximum length of just over 400mm, and a throat depth up to a maximum of 100mm.

The photograph shows the Axminster bar clamp (top) with two 5mm holes drilled in the bar to allow attachment to the jig (shown below), which has two corresponding M5 machine screws with wing nuts to hold the clamp in place.

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Jig set up to cut a log of holly. Jig set up to cut a log of holly. 17th March 2016.

Photo of the jig in use to cut along a large log of Holly. Note how the jig abuts on the left hand side with the fence of the bandsaw, thereby ensuring a straight cut.

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After making a cut. After making a cut. 17th March 2016.

Using the fence as a guide has ensured a relatively straight cut.

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Preparing to use the jig to cut a crotch of Holm Oak. Preparing to use the jig to cut a crotch. 21st March 2016.

This jig is particularly useful for preparing branched wood for the lathe. In this photograph the jig is being used to cut through a crotch of Holm Oak.

(Click picture for larger view)

After making the cut. After making the cut. 21st March 2016.

The spectacular figured wood of the crotch is revealed on the cut surfaces.

(Click picture for larger view)


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