Garage/Workshop conversion
Garage-workshop conversion
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HOME PAGE PHASE 1. Back door removal & window replacement. PHASE 2. Construction of a stud framework supporting eight joists.

PHASE 3. Plasterboard ceiling construction.
(This page)

PHASE 4. Partition construction with relocated door. PHASE 5 Construction of mezzanine floor. PHASE 6. Installation of wall insulation & OSB sheathing. PHASE 7. Electrical re-wiring.
Garage/Workshop conversion
Garage/workshop conversion
FITTING OUT PROJECTS WOOD-TURNING
PROJECTS
APPENDIX 1. Measurements & materials.

Phase 3. Installation of a Plasterboard Ceiling.


20th July 2015
Plasterboard (for ceiling) and chipboard flooring delivered by Travis Perkins.

Details

Plasterboard & chipboard flooring delivered 20th July 2015 Plasterboard & chipboard (for mezzanine floor) delivered 20th July 2015.

Ceiling to be constructed first, using the plasterboard.

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Synopsis of Work for Plasterboard Ceiling
Sheets as ordered (but not delivered, see next paragraph), were 1800mm x 900mm x 12.5mm, with tapered edges. Sheets of this size are just manageable for handling by one person. Boards were screwed (but not glued) to the joists using 38mm long (3.5mm diameter) drywall screws at 150mm intervals. I devised temporary supporting jigs to hold the plasterboard sheets temporarily in place against the joists so they could be screwed in place. With the plasterboard sheets thus held securely, the centre-lines of the overlying joists were first pencilled in on the plasterboard sheets and then the 150mm screw intervals marked using a 150mm length of scrap wood. Pilot holes for the drywall screws were pre-drilled using a 2.5mm diameter drill bit. The boards were then screwed into place easily by hand (not using an electric driver which although quicker, can all too easily over drive the screws through the fragile facing paper into the underlying plaster of the board!).

To finish I scrimmed (using self adhesive fibreglass jointing tape), over the joins, and then covered with several coats of ready mixed jointing compound. The joints were sanded (using a sanding block) before priming then painting with white emulsion paint.

21st July 2015. Plasterboard Delivery Error!
On closer examination of the delivered plasterboard sheets it became apparent that instead of supplying 7 sheets measuring 1,800mm x 900mm x 12.5mm, as ordered and paid for (and as printed on the delivery note), 7 sheets measuring 2,400mm x 1,200 x 12.5mm were delivered instead, which was much more than needed. It was also be much harder for me to handle (on my own) as the sheets were considerably heavier (24kg!) compared to the smaller size (15kg) ordered!


Plasterboard supports construction. Plasterboard Temporary Support Construction. 22nd July 2015.

I decided that the easiest way to attach the large sheets of plasterboard to the ceiling joists was to construct three temporary joists spanning the whole width of the workshop. This method (which thankfully worked very well!), temporarily supported the plasterboard sheets from underneath whilst they were screwed to the bottom surfaces of the (70mm higher) permanent joists. One temporary joist was constructed from a spare 300mm x 145mm x 45mm timber left over from the construction of the permanent joists. The two other temporary joists utilised 95mm x 70mm timber which was later used in the construction of the workshop stud wall partition. These temporary joists rested on (and were not screwed to) supports, one at each end of the joist, constructed from 70mm x 45mm offcuts left over from construction of the studwork wall lining. Each of the two supports (per temporary joist) were attached by two 90mm long 6mm diameter hexagonal headed coach screws (as used for attaching the wall studwork), fastened with plastic plugs to the brick walls between the studs. The photo shows the temporary joists in place with the first two constructed from 95mm x 70mm timber and the back one from 145mm x 45mm timber.

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Cutting plasterboard, 27th July 2015.

After marking out the plasterboard using a pencil and straight edge, it can be fairly easily cut to size using a variety of methods. I found the easiest way was to use a jigsaw with small teeth (as specified for cutting plastic). This ensures that the paper-based backing is not cut jaggedly.

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation 25th July 2015.

The first sheet was cut to size and then hoisted into place fairly easily, I found that two people were easily able to manoeuvre the first sheet (white paper side down), through the 70mm gap above the first temporary joist. Care was needed to push and pull the sheet over the other two temporary joists without damaging the fragile paper covering.

Note how the front edge of the positioned plasterboard, is half way across the edge of the overlying permanent joist. Also the use of scrap pieces of wood which can be used between the temporary joists and the plasterboard to bring the boards closer for screwing to the overlying permanent joists.

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation 25th July 2015.

The next stage is to use a straight edge to rule pencil lines on the plasterboard corresponding to the overlying mid points of the joists. In the photograph, the overlying joist can be seen on the left, whilst on the right, the mid point has been extrapolated from the pencil line on a previously fixed plasterboard sheet.

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation 27th July 2015.

Using a scrap piece of wood 150mm long, as a template to mark off the positions of the drywall screws at 150mm intervals.

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation 27th July 2015.

Drilling 2.5mm pilot holes through the plasterboard and into the overlying joist to take the 3.5mm drywall screws. Once each hole is drilled, the drywall screw is placed in position, ready to drive home.

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation 27th July 2015.

Driving the drywall screws home. I preferred using a hand screwdriver, as using an electric driver, although faster, increases the risk of overtightening the screw so the head penetrates the paper covering into the underlying plaster of the board!

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation 27th July 2015.

Work in progress 1, showing how two sheets of plasterboard abut under a joist. Here the first sheet has been screwed into place on the joist.

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation, 27th July 2015.

Work in progress 2, showing how two sheets of plasterboard abut under a joist. Here the second sheet has been screwed into place abutting the first one and sharing the same overlying joist.

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation, 27th July 2015.

First two rows completed, only a narrow strip on the right to do!

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation, 27th July 2015.

Last piece of plasterboard being fixed!

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Plasterboard ceiling installation. Plasterboard Ceiling Installation 27th July 2015.

Photograph showing all the plasterboards fixed in place and the temporary joists (used to support the boards whilst screwing them to the overlying permanent joists), removed. The Sketchup drawing of the ceiling is also shown for comparison.

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To finish the ceiling, the joints between the boards and also the heads of the screws were filled with jointing compound and sanded before painting with white emulsion paint.

Materials for ceiling completion. Materials for ceiling completion 1st August 2015.

10Kg tub of ready-mixed jointing compound, fibreglass self-adhesive jointing tape, various application tools. The Hawke and Float are essential for minimising mess (The hawke is great for holding the plaster whilst using the other hand for holding the float which can easily scoop the plaster off the hawke and then the hawke is held underneath the area where the plaster is being applied and catches all the drips and spills!)

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Applying self adhesive jointing tape. Applying Self Adhesive Jointing Tape, 6th August 2015.

The adhesive tape is applied along the joint between two adjacent plasterboards.

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Applying jointing compound. Applying jointing compound, 6th August 2015.

Using the Float, jointing compound is pressed into the joint through the jointing tape. The photograph shows work in progress. Once cured, a second coat of jointing compound is applied and smoothed out over the first, prior to sanding when cured. The Jointing compound is also used to fill the depressions made in the plasterboard by the drywall screw-heads.

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Sanding smooth the jointing compound. Sanding smooth the jointing compound, 7th August 2015.

Using a sanding block and 40 grit abrasive paper to sand smooth the jointing compound applied to the joints. If you really want a smooth finish, then follow up with 100 grit abrasive paper.

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Sanded ceiling ready for painting. Sanded ceiling ready for painting, 11th August 2015.

Ceiling after sanding with 40 grit abrasive paper. I didn't use any finer abrasive grades for a smoother surface, but I would have done if decorating a room in the house where a smoother finish would be required!

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Completed painted ceiling. Completed painted ceiling & completion of Phase 3, 12th August 2015.

The ceiling was given two coats of white emulsion applied with a roller. Very quick to do and no brush needed.

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Ceiling completed 12th August 2015.


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